What does teaching for meaningful learning mean?

This paper teaching for meaningful learning provides a rich review of the different strategies and methods of teaching and learning to achieve meaningful learning.

Complex projects and activities which challenge learners to engage in active authentic learning – based on authentic pedagogy and likely a constructivist and or connectivist learning approach provides opportunities for learners to sensemake (Siemens, 2012) and learn how to solve real life problems.

Besides, the meaningful learning prepares learners to keep abreast of the changing knowledge ecology and learning landscape, which is often required both in the business world and personal knowledge development.  This aligns well with the connectivist principles where learning needs to stay current:

  • Currency (accurate, up-to-date knowledge) is the intent of all connectivist learning activities.

Decision-making itself is a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality. While there is a right answer now, it may be wrong tomorrow due to alterations in the information climate affecting the decision (Siemens, 2005, para. 24).

This also relates to the Connectivist learning by Stephen Downes.

About these ads

15 thoughts on “What does teaching for meaningful learning mean?

  1. Pingback: What does teaching for meaningful learning mean? | Learner Weblog | Teaching and Learning at Central Academy of Ohio | Scoop.it

  2. Pingback: Jorge González Alonso (jgonzalonso) | Pearltrees

  3. Pingback: Connectivism and Its Relationship with Meaningful Learning. | Connectivism | Scoop.it

  4. A major problem with the aims of learning is that teachers most of the time are satisfied if students can react to information: is this true or false, fill in the blank, complete the sentence, answer the question in a phrase, choose among 4 alternatives, and so on. This pervasive design stops well short of mastery. When you master something, you have the whole thing in your head and can think actively about it–alter nuances and understand their impact on the whole, shift parts, reprioritize factors, and so on. Any competent adult does this in the area of their competence. Teaching for such an outcome is not difficult if one just uses class time to achieve it. In my 3-volume Practice Makes Permanent series being published by Rowman and Littlefield, I explain this problem and an easy approach to solving it. If anyone is interested, I can email to them the proof copies of the three books. Send you email address to jjensen@gci.net. Best regards, John Jensen

  5. Pingback: Connectivism and Its Relationship with Meaningful Learning. | Educación Virtual UNET | Scoop.it

  6. Pingback: Connectivism and Its Relationship with Meaningful Learning. | Educación y TIC | Scoop.it

  7. Pingback: Connectivism and Its Relationship with Meaningful Learning. | ¿Cómo aprendemos? | Scoop.it

  8. Pingback: Connectivism and Its Relationship with Meaningful Learning. | Cambio paradigma educativo | Scoop.it

  9. Meaningful learning happens more easily when the focus is on learning instead of teaching. The paradigm change is necessary: learning and teaching are two different phenomena that sometimes occur in the same physical space (i.e. classroom). Teachers should be allowed to choose how they teach – within reasonable limits, of course – because supporting and facilitating students’ learning cannot be forced into a formula. Each student is a unique learner with an individual set of skills, and good teachers have always found ways to support this individual learning. We can never create the same competence by following the thoughts of someone else as we do while thinking with out own brain – this is why teaching should be about “how” to think instead of “what” to think. This is also more meaningful for both students and teachers.

  10. While “how” to think is a field of knowledge that is a “what” all its own. You learn the meaning and use of faculties of mind. But the critical context is the “what” of a broad field of mastered knowledge, what educated people know in order to run their own lives and operate the world around them. And a key problem is that if people’s grasp of this body of knowledge is superficial–i.e. if they have vague and distorted ideas about the entire range of reality in which we live–their use of “how” to think is of little value. People can be brilliant in the midst of disastrous knowledge and values. What we want is the steady accumulation of a valid and constructive picture of the world and ideas and people and values accompanied by a growing competence to apply the resources of mind to it. For anyone interested on more about this direction of thinking, I’m glad to send the proof copies of my 3-volume Practice Makes Permanent series being published by Rowman and Littlefield. Send email to jjensen@gci.net.

  11. Pingback: Connectivism and Its Relationship with Meaningful Learning. | Gabriel Catalano the name of the game | Scoop.it

  12. Pingback: Connectivism and Its Relationship with Meaningful Learning. | Creativity & Multicultural Communication | Scoop.it

  13. Pingback: What does teaching for meaningful learning mean? More connections | Comunicación, Mercadotecnia, Publicidad y Medios... | Scoop.it

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s