#CFHE12 #Oped12 MOOCs emerging as Landscape of Change – Part 1

This presentation on Power and Ecosystems of Change – by Ann Pendleton – Jullian is amazing.

Here are some focus points:

From Re-framing to Ecosystems of change

We need new methods and mechanisms

– reality mining, micro-narratives

– boundaries, probes, and modulators

– studio based methods and approaches

– strategic game design

I particularly like the triangle where

Meta-narrative

Social Networks  ——- Mechanism

micro-narrative

was used to explain the connections between the various parts of the ecosystem.

Ann points out the changes involved – from control to communities to cohorts.  Also triangles are fractals in nature.  To me, such forms of triangles have always evolved in social networks as I have shared in my previous posts, see here and here.  I think some of the micro-narratives have evolved as fractals that are further embedded as “fractals” as appeared in social networks – the social networks patterns.  The textexture is an example illustrating how a narrative could be visualized in a network form.

Another example is the Linked In Network, as illustrated below with the social network graph.

I could associate some of the changes in power and the structural changes in the ecosystem – as observed throughout the MOOCs that I have participated in.  MOOCs – i.e. CCKs – 08, 09, 11, 12, Change, eduFuture, and various other connectivist MOOCs could be viewed as an emerging platform which encapsulated the changes – change in terms of the properties of networks –

autonomy

openness

diversity

connectivity

“The research found that autonomy, diversity, openness and connectedness/interactivity are indeed characteristics of a MOOC, but that they present paradoxes which are difficult to resolve in an online course. The more autonomous, diverse and open the course, and the more connected the learners, the more the potential for their learning to be limited by the lack of structure, support and moderation normally associated with an online course, and the more they seek to engage in traditional groups as opposed to an open network.” (Mackness, et al 2010)

Recent MOOCs had adopted a learning as change approach towards “de-centralising” the power that may be connected with “groups” and further distributing the knowledge based on authentic learning with PLE/PLN as the principal basis of personalized learning.

I will continue to explore this pattern of change in my part 2.

The meme of 2012

What is the most popular meme in 2012?

I wonder if Gangnam style be the most popular one. Here is just one of them – with MIT.

Another from Stanford University.

Alec says in his post:

It’s not quite factual (as argued elsewhere) that the song ‘lacked’ a copyright, but it is certainly clear that Psy has encouraged the remix and reuse of the song which has led to some incredible statistics(such as being the first video to reach 1 billion views). And, besides the ability to reuse/remix, the song is just downright catchy.

That’s an interesting trend, with meme after meme snowballing to become a tsunami meme. I hope it could initiate more awareness on what it means to human when connected through such meme. Sometimes, it could become a disruptive technology, setting off a new benchmark for people to catch up.

What sort of changes would these set up with the rest of the world? What are the impacts of “Gangnam” culture on the “mainstream culture”? History would hint us that these would all undergo a life cycle of – introduction, growth and development, maturity and then obsolescence.

This has been the case for rock and roll, pop music, and so is the “DIY” – remix and repurpose culture. May be the biggest change is the concept of Open “musical” resources where people would continue to create parodies out of these memes. What do you think?