A reflection of MOOCs Part 3 The yin and yang of MOOCs

You may wonder: What is the yin and yang of MOOCs?

The yin, the dark side of MOOCs is well illustrated in this post on Sir John crosses to the dark side public universities and outsourcing online learning by Tony Bates

The yang, the bright side of MOOC is well illustrated in this post on moocs changing the face of e-learning.

I would explore and dig deeper into this Yin part in my next post.

I would look at the Yang (bright side) of xMOOCs first:

Like to have a glimpse from those xMOOCs participants’ perspective: read it here.

Which part of the post did you find most interesting?  I reckon the video below:

To me, that is the gamification of the course – what makes the course interesting, fun, and engaging for these young students all learning with curiosity!

What could I conclude?  I have shared it here:

In summary, what is more important in MOOC is not just the theory, or the principles as suggested, but the actual projects and community or networks that are created, developed and worked on.  This would take away the often ”known” ways of learning with a MOOC.  That is the EMERGENT LEARNING both for the individuals and the networks.  There may be some educators and learners who could feel it too hard to do it in a MOOC, and so instead of doing a whole Connectivism course, why not having it designed in parts, so participants would only choose what they need only?

If we are to ask participants to design courses or sub-networks (with events, workshops, seminars, presentation, activities), then those designs would most likely be refined by the participants, implemented and evaluated more successfully, as they are the master piece of their suggestions, and so learning is built into the design with continuous improvement and review.

These xMOOCs students would soon realize that they could equally design and be the author of such courses that they have learnt from their professors.  The old saying is still true: if you want to be the master of teaching, you need to learn first, then teach through learning, and learn through teaching.

Lisa Lane once said: I learn through teaching.

And I echoed that with, I learn through learning with both teaching and learning in these MOOCs, or networks of MOOCs.

For those xMOOCs students, or participants, do you see it this way?

That makes the Yang of xMOOCs.

6 thoughts on “A reflection of MOOCs Part 3 The yin and yang of MOOCs

  1. Pingback: A reflection of MOOCs Part 3 The yin and yang of MOOCs | Educación a Distancia (EaD) | Scoop.it

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