Is lecturing the cream of future massive online education?

It seems that video lectures are the golden cream of xMOOCs, and even Khan Academy.  So lecture is still the predominant technology that has been hailed as the most primitive, yet an effective method of “disseminating” and transferring knowledge.

Not that simple, as argued in this post- is-lecture-capture-the-worst-educational-technology.

  1. Large scale recording of lectures perpetuates an outdated and increasingly discredited passive learning experience. Before all the great lecturers jump up and down and say how great lecturing is you have to admit that you are the exception and not the rule and most academics, although they may be good educators, are poor presenters in the lecture theatre.
  2. The technology does nothing to engage the student who instead of sitting passively in a lecture theatre checking their text messages will now sit passively in front of a screen at home checking their text messages.
  3. Traditional lectures aren’t designed for online delivery. They’re too long. Their length is designed to fit in with the timetabling constraints of the buildings in which lectures take place not for any pedagogical reason. Why should this physical constraint be allowed to migrate its way into flexible online delivery?
  4. Using the technology takes away technical effort, funding and other resources that could be better used in consolidating other enterprise wide educational technologies and in providing more widely available and timely staff development and support.

Video lectures seem to be viewed as very important in massive content delivery, as in the case of xMOOCs.  Otherwise, we won’t even know if the super professors exist, as they could all be behind the scenes.

I have posted here is-lecturing-the-cream-of-teaching-at-the-mercy-of-learning.  Lecturing could be a good pill for some students, especially for the novice who needs to learn  about content knowledge.

Would it still be effective for the veterans or advanced learners, or professors?  I think lectures (short video lectures) would still be the hallmark for rock star or super professor, as that is where one could reach the massive population of students in a MOOC environment.  I would really like to see a xMOOC without any videos (or video lectures) and still be able to attract tens of thousand students.

May be cMOOCs could do without much video lectures, as the students actually make the videos, share and learn between themselves, as witnessed in MOOCMOOC, and various network communities on FB or Google +.

Let’s see if lecture would survive the next decade of education.  I reckon it would still be alive in face-to-face classroom learning.  What do you think?

11 thoughts on “Is lecturing the cream of future massive online education?

  1. Pingback: Is lecturing the cream of future massive online education? | Digital Delights | Scoop.it

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  7. Pingback: Is lecturing the cream of future massive online education? | Blog de Norman Trujillo

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  11. Pingback: Is lecturing the cream of future massive online education? | Learner ... | 3C Media Solutions | Scoop.it

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