Role of professor and learners in MOOCs

Is professor still at the centre stage of MOOCs?

Yes, six years on since 2008, and it seems that the professors of courses have been brought back to the spotlight in cMOOC.

Who initiated the learning revolution?  I have shared them in my previous posts here and here.

In my post what are teachers for?

The present xMOOCs have all focus on education on a massive scale, leading to automated teaching (short videos with the instructors exposition of the essential concepts, procedures) with quizzes, followed by assignments, tests and examinations etc. Flipping the classroom has merely changed the procedures in teaching – by asking the learners to view teaching by teachers (or animated videos, or documentary etc.) first, and discuss that after. This is similar to the video based distance learning in the past decade, except that now we could incorporate forum, discussion boards to allow peer-to-peer discussion, and teachers to explain on more advanced concepts or applications, or respond to some of the questions raised. The use of synchronous session may be used in both x and c MOOCs as a way to further discuss the ideas or questions relating to assigned readings, or videos. That’s basically a replica of what are typical in classroom teaching, in most cases, except that these are now all digital, with artifacts readily available for rewind, recap, and re-view. The teachers are needed to have the first recording, after then they might only be needed in future courses for responding to students.

Photo: Google image

Teaching (3)

Here are the forum posts on MOODLE in CCK08:

Role of teachers – Teaching the Teachers

Can a network of learners serve the same role as a teacher or professor?

Have there been much changes in the role of professor and learners in MOOCs (x and c MOOCs) since 2008?

Are these changes based on learner-center or teacher-center or both?

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27 thoughts on “Role of professor and learners in MOOCs

  1. Pingback: Role of professor and learners in MOOCs | Digital Delights | Scoop.it

  2. With the adoptation of digital technology in education, roles of learners and teachers are bound to change. For me, the question is still how best to connect with learners through the use of tech. Not all e-learning/online is engaging. However, the best courses are definitely engaging and a pleasure to take.

    A question of roles.

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  10. Everyone in MOOCs are learners. Those who contributed to the success of cck08, Etienne Wenger, Dave Wiley, Terry Anderson, George Siemens, Stephen Downes, Helene Fournier, Grainne Conole, Chris Dede, Wendy Drexler, Lisa Lane, Nancy White, Graham Atwell, Zaid Alsagoff and the others–far more than I can cite in this post–had substantive knowledge, expertise, and a wide range of technical skills, and they had connections to institutions. They were generous in their sharing; they have contributed significantly to the knowledge-base and research related to moocs. The network connections that were made through participation in ccko8 were substantive; they have led to a sustained engagement and to sensible application for the participants who stayed the course, whether as credit-learners or not. What was it about the way the CCK08 mooc was designed that made it so effective? Ask Stephen Downes, as he was the connector; he understood flow within a network, even before he put in place the mooc. What was it about the opennes of the entire sequence of courses that enabled very diverse people to continue with the learning and to continue to contribute in the conversation? It was the professors and the learners. The participants, including you, John, have maintained a loosely-linked community, sharing and learning with and from each other, and we have enjoyed it when others have joined the community and the conversation (in this post Ana Cristina Pratas) and we continue to share and develop knowledge and expertise. A good, sustained, critical, measured, well-researched project contributes to the future of education for the many because it invites open, sustained, critical, and measured and coherent learning to occur. George Seimens wrote in CCKO8 that he was striving to develop and to help others a coherent narrative… That makes sense, doesn’t it? It sounds educative.

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  15. Without a sense of human presence in education we are reduced to reporting our activities to a compilation machine. What sort of expectations and understandings could we build into even the most sophisticated software that would allow us to “believe” it was communicating with us? Human perception is unpredictably complex in a way we seem able to understand at a different (and important) level than we understand the complexity of a pin-ball game. Humans have identifiable intentionality and machines can appear to be intentional too but it was loaded into them and not theirs.

    My whole life there’s been a background belief in machines becoming “better” versions of humans and I think this contributes to gross mistakes in technological aids to education. As if we were to render an idea at just the optimum number of pixels for its truth to emerge.

    If we had schools for machines and schools for humans my guess would be the machines would be hiring human faculty while the human administrators in the people schools would be awarding each other for “progress in advancing education” by removing the human element:-)

  16. I really like the reminder that Mary Rearick highlights – education as a narrative through connections – for it is through narratives that one learns and progresses. Scott Johnson’s comments also are meaningful, especially as I re-reading “Alone Together: by Sherry Turkle, where the fascination of machines, i.e. robots, is clearly described.

    Narratives. That is where the learning lies. And roles are created.

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  24. Pingback: On Education Matters Part 2 – Role of teachers in MOOCs | Learner Weblog

  25. I seldom create remarks, but i did some
    searching and wound up here Role of professor and learners in MOOCs | Learner Weblog.
    And I actually do have 2 questions for you if you don’t mind. Is it simply me or does it appear like some of these remarks appear like they are coming from brain dead visitors? :-P And, if you are writing on other places, I would like to follow everything new you have to post. Would you list of every one of all your social sites like your linkedin profile, Facebook page or twitter feed?

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