Love

I found this video on Evolution, Emotion, and Reason: Love very interesting.

There are three elements of love: Intimacy, Passion and Commitment.

How would one apply the concept of love in social networking and online learning?

Does it explain why some people are more able to connect to others, because of the “love” factor?  Or is that empty love if there is only commitment in networking, with no intimacy or passion?

Love your enemy as thyself.  That is a teaching of Jesus Christ from the New Testament.  Is that love also applicable to “enemy” in an online environment?

How would you define love in online networking or networked learning?

Postscript: Another interesting video on love

The Last Lecture

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6 thoughts on “Love

  1. Dear John,
    I am glad to read a post about Love because I consider this an important and necessary attitude for life, and learning experience most. I consider Love an attitude rather than a feeling towards others and, of course main to us.
    I enjoyed a lot the videos and regarding them, I consider that “Love” have different meanings according the context and, as we could see on the Psychology studies, I think that it works mainly depending on to subjectivity.
    How would you define love in online networking or networked learning? As I referred at the begining, It is a conscious decision that it is reflected on attitudes. So we could define “Love” in online networking or networked learning as an attitude reflected on our interactions that involves: respect, dedication, solidarity, commitment, wisdom and requires to manifest our interest to others. I think that dedication is one of the most important values, (especially on learning network) on behalf if we like or dislike the other person. We pay attention to others and contribute to their development, their wellbeing taking into account their needs.
    How would one apply the concept of love in social networking and online learning? Taking into account and putting in practice what I mention on the previous reply.
    Does it explain why some people are more able to connect to others, because of the “love” factor? Or is that empty love if there is only commitment in networking, with no intimacy or passion? According to the Yale Professor and Helen Fisher´s speeches, In my opinion, there is an underneath need that motivates People to connect each others on networks and that is: the need to being recognized themselves, to being needed, too being valued. Then, there might be many others reasons: achieving goals, proposals of work, to share meanings. But as I consider, the main reason that moves people to be connected is an attitude of Love.

    In the end Love in on line networks or learning networking is also, when we attend our needs without damaging others. For example, when attending our need of health, we decide to take a rest disconnecting ourselves from networking in order to recover from a stressful learning session.
    With love,
    María Fernanda

  2. Thanks Maria for your sharing your wonderful insights.
    I love to repeat your message: “In the end Love in on line networks or learning networking is also, when we attend our needs without damaging others.” That sounds both practical and helpful. That’s love.
    John

  3. It’s great to hear someone raise the issue of love with respect to networked learning. This is a topic close to my heart.

    And I love Maria’s thoughts too: “So we could define “Love” in online networking or networked learning as an attitude reflected on our interactions that involves: respect, dedication, solidarity, commitment, wisdom and requires to manifest our interest to others.”

    What I have found interesting in following the open learning and networked learning discussion over the years is the term “love” is is never really mentioned despite there being constant talk of empowering learners, encouraging autonomy and independence and the right to make one’s own choices, supporting people in pursing their own interests, setting their own goals, expressing their talents and living up to their full potential, not to mention the qualities that Maria describes.

    Sounds like love to me!

    Although “love” is a tricky word, especially in the Anglo-saxon culture. The word is often associated with romantic or sexual love, so it is understandable that academics and theorists avoid the term.

    I wonder how Stephen and George and Dave would resond if it was suggested that the models of learning they were promoting were really about encouraging teachers to love their students! :-)

    This is why it might be best to use the term “compassion” in the Buddhist sense; it avoids those tricky connotations.

    Thanks for raising the issue. I was thinking of posting my thoughts on this topic later on. Raising it makes it easier for me to do that.

  4. Hi Sean,
    Thanks for your comments. Yes, I share your and Maria’s thoughts about love as an attitude, as that would stay away from the traditional notion of love which education authority would be concerned especially when it comes to Child Protection Policy. Compassion (the feeling of pity that makes one want to help or show mercy) is often an alternative way of expressing how a teacher would like to help the students, which is also part of that “love of teaching, love of students” This http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZbOQqtDAW0 interview on last lecture reveals how Professor Randy Pausch showed his passion in teaching and love for his students throughout his teaching life. His inspiration had awaken many educators and learners to rethink about the significance and value of life and the importance of having that passion & dreams fulfillment passing on to our next generation.
    Unfortunately, he had passed away already…
    But, his legacy is LOVE.
    John

  5. What a refreshing message after so many PLEs/PLNs and concept maps, John.
    Thanks for beginning the conversation.

    I’d like to add that I think empathy drives much of the expressions of caring and consideration that I see in online environments as well as in the actual. To try and relate to another and see the world through their eyes is an act of compassion. And creativity. Daniel Pink of A Whole New Mind includes empathy as one of the six senses of creativity.

    I enjoyed your videos and would like to add this one by Clay Shirky, who may not get a lot of respect in PLENK 2010 circles, but certainly shares some powerful connections — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xe1TZaElTAs

  6. Pingback: #Change11 Lets all who want to learn learn | Learner Weblog

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